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Blogging Against Disablism Day: Now Available in "Bitter" May. 1st, 2009 @ 08:33 am
So, today is Blogging Against Disablism Day.

I hadn't decided whether I wanted to participate or not, but... this is kind of a problem. As are other things, and once I start ranting, I tend to go on for a bit.

Hoyden About Town is not a blog known for its fail status, but right now, for me, it kind of is. The summary:

Domestic violence commercial that is graphic and disturbing is banned from UK cinemas. In criticising this decision, Hoyden provides a link to the commercial in question - with trigger warnings.

To summarise what ensued:

Me: Uh, if it's potentially triggering for survivors of abuse, actually, I think it shouldn't be in cinemas. Because, surely, survivors of abuse should be able to go to the movies without having triggering content be part of the pre-movie commercials. I can judge my movie choices based on trigger risk. Commercials themselves should not be triggering.

OP: Well, you could just go in after the commercials, as the movie is starting.

Me: ...


My posted reply in comments may have substituted a fairly large amount of sarcasm for "..." because no really what the hell. Making it necessary for survivors of abuse to include awkward, socially-borderline-unacceptable, definitely-inconvenient-and-annoying requirements for going to the movies is not what I'd call a good solution, here. Entering the cinema while the house lights are up? Getting decent seats? Watching the previews?

NOT FOR YOU, YOU EMOTIONAL CRIPPLE! If you wanted to see previews, you should have known better than to be abused, shouldn't you? God, just suck it up and stop having post-traumatic stress disorder already, you whiner.

Not that I'm editorialising, but that is not cool.

Today's message about dealing with people with invisible disabilities amounts to this:

Putting the onus of avoiding further harm on the victim is wrong. Placing trigger-warning-worthy content in carelessly public places amounts to further victimisation. Denying victims of abuse the option of normal enjoyment of entertainment options is unfair and wrong.

Dear Mindy@Hoyden,

Helping? UR DOIN IT WRONG.

Kiss my PTSD-having abuse-survivor ass,
Sami

Current Mood: annoyed

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