Moments of Permanence

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Oh, give me a break May. 17th, 2009 @ 11:01 am
Mr Barnett described the poll question as “unnecessarily complex” and said he believed West Australians would not have to go back to the polls on the question for at least another decade.
Ranting. )

Current Mood: really damn sick of DST


Blogging Against Disablism Day: Now Available in "Bitter" May. 1st, 2009 @ 08:33 am
So, today is Blogging Against Disablism Day.

I hadn't decided whether I wanted to participate or not, but... this is kind of a problem. As are other things, and once I start ranting, I tend to go on for a bit.

Hoyden About Town is not a blog known for its fail status, but right now, for me, it kind of is. The summary:

Domestic violence commercial that is graphic and disturbing is banned from UK cinemas. In criticising this decision, Hoyden provides a link to the commercial in question - with trigger warnings.

To summarise what ensued:

Me: Uh, if it's potentially triggering for survivors of abuse, actually, I think it shouldn't be in cinemas. Because, surely, survivors of abuse should be able to go to the movies without having triggering content be part of the pre-movie commercials. I can judge my movie choices based on trigger risk. Commercials themselves should not be triggering.

OP: Well, you could just go in after the commercials, as the movie is starting.

Me: ...


My posted reply in comments may have substituted a fairly large amount of sarcasm for "..." because no really what the hell. Making it necessary for survivors of abuse to include awkward, socially-borderline-unacceptable, definitely-inconvenient-and-annoying requirements for going to the movies is not what I'd call a good solution, here. Entering the cinema while the house lights are up? Getting decent seats? Watching the previews?

NOT FOR YOU, YOU EMOTIONAL CRIPPLE! If you wanted to see previews, you should have known better than to be abused, shouldn't you? God, just suck it up and stop having post-traumatic stress disorder already, you whiner.

Not that I'm editorialising, but that is not cool.

Today's message about dealing with people with invisible disabilities amounts to this:

Putting the onus of avoiding further harm on the victim is wrong. Placing trigger-warning-worthy content in carelessly public places amounts to further victimisation. Denying victims of abuse the option of normal enjoyment of entertainment options is unfair and wrong.

Dear Mindy@Hoyden,

Helping? UR DOIN IT WRONG.

Kiss my PTSD-having abuse-survivor ass,
Sami

Current Mood: annoyed


Somewhere between a PSA and Schadenfreude Apr. 29th, 2009 @ 09:21 am
Sometimes I leave my phone in my bedroom. This is extra-likely if I'm feeling fragile. The way I see it, if someone wants to get in touch with me by phone (which, in the evenings, is rare), one of the following will be true:

1) They have the home number, and will call that.
2) They have Dean or Chas's number, and will call that.
3) It won't be urgent.
4) They'll be someone I don't want to deal with.

In not unrelated news, last night my mother and sister spent a chunk of last night in a panic, around the time I was having dinner and chatting to housemates.

When I went to bed, I heard my phone buzz its "you have an SMS, you negligent fool" reminder, found and checked it, and uncovered this sequence:

Message One: My Father

Help! Please call me. I am in an emergency.

Now, I have seen this before. This is a function of his phone - you trigger the emergency alert and it sends this message to people you've specified (in his case, me, my mother, and my sister), and also switches to a mode where it automatically answers when called.

I knew I had subsequent messages, however, so I did not immediately react to this.

Next message: service provider notification that I have a voicemail. I'll check that in a second.

Message Three: My Father

I an fine (sic)

Message Four: My Father

My apologies for the alarm. It somehow got triggered while the phone was in my sports bag. Setting it up seemed like a good idea at the time ...

Ladies and gentlemen, my father.

The voicemail was from my mother, explaining that everything was okay, but she and my sister had had a half hour panic. Just to check, I called my parents. First I spoke to my father, and mocked him for the fact that his phone has an emergency panic mode that a) he has now triggered by accident twice and b) he cannot remember how to trigger on purpose. So all the emergency alert system actually tells us is that my father is almost certainly fine, just, you know... thing!

I laughed at him a bit for this.

Then I talked to my mother for a while. (Opening statement when she took the phone: "You know you married an idiot, right?" "Yes.") As I suspected, the panic was the time mother and sister spent trying to find out if Dad was actually in an emergency. Mum tried to contact the leisure centre he was playing squash at, but they were having a problem with the phone system... so she called one a couple of suburbs over and explained the problem. The helpful receptionist at Craigie e-mailed Heathridge, and when Heathridge's receptionist checked her e-mail, she was able to call my mother back, and make contact with my not-emergency-experiencing father.

Meanwhile, my sister was also in a tizzy about what was happening to her daddy that set this off.

I suspect that around this time, I was reading out viola jokes to my amused housemates.

Mum and I talked for a while, and some of it was probably good and important communication, and I was very sympathetic... but sympathy in my family is often accompanied by snickering.

The moral of the story is twofold: First, I am possibly a bad person to consider an "emergency contact", at least if you're relying on my mobile phone; however, since the only person who lists me as an emergency contact is my father, who only emergency-contacts me by accident, this really doesn't amount to much. Second, if you do need to get hold of me and I don't answer my phone, call the house phone or someone I live with.

Asking the internet Apr. 28th, 2009 @ 12:20 pm
So, here's the thing.

I know from reading posts like this that certain things my hair does are quite common with some types of hair more common in people of non-European/non-Asian descent.

However, I think that on the scale of asking non-white people to Represent Their Race, going up to random black people with nice hair and saying, "Your hair is awesome! How do you do it?" might come across just ever-so-slightly wrong.

The trouble is, I don't actually know anyone with hair like mine, and I've only seen people talk about hair like mine in the context of dealing with "black" hair. Most of it's fine - it's thick, it's curly, I haven't had it cut or trimmed in at least three years so I have slight split ends I'll get around to having trimmed at some point, and I manage it by being sure to use conditioner and keeping it braided almost all the time to keep it the hell out of my face, and it doesn't bother me. (And I can surprise people on special occasions by busting out some serious curls.)

But the hair near my neck refuses to get long, so it won't go into the braid, and it sticks out in ways I find both irksome and kind of distracting. That hair is tangly, kinky, and fragile. It gets about three or four inches long and then it gets tangly and knotty (even self-knotting) and breaks a lot.

Anyone know what I should do to maintain it better?

Asking the internet Apr. 28th, 2009 @ 12:20 pm
So, here's the thing.

I know from reading posts like this that certain things my hair does are quite common with some types of hair more common in people of non-European/non-Asian descent.

However, I think that on the scale of asking non-white people to Represent Their Race, going up to random black people with nice hair and saying, "Your hair is awesome! How do you do it?" might come across just ever-so-slightly wrong.

The trouble is, I don't actually know anyone with hair like mine, and I've only seen people talk about hair like mine in the context of dealing with "black" hair. Most of it's fine - it's thick, it's curly, I haven't had it cut or trimmed in at least three years so I have slight split ends I'll get around to having trimmed at some point, and I manage it by being sure to use conditioner and keeping it braided almost all the time to keep it the hell out of my face, and it doesn't bother me. (And I can surprise people on special occasions by busting out some serious curls.)

But the hair near my neck refuses to get long, so it won't go into the braid, and it sticks out in ways I find both irksome and kind of distracting. That hair is tangly, kinky, and fragile. It gets about three or four inches long and then it gets tangly and knotty (even self-knotting) and breaks a lot.

Anyone know what I should do to maintain it better?
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